Megalodon Facts and Information - All about Megalodon Sharks:
History, Evolution, Fossil Shark Teeth Identification, Fossil Examples, Fossil Hunting Locations, Megalodon vs whales, and more!


Like us on Facebook:

If you like this content,
Please Share this Page:


submit to reddit
More Megalodon Information
Megalodon Tooth Size vs Body Size
Megalodon Evolution
Is Megalodon Alive?
Megalodon MegaMugs!

Return to FOSSILGUY MAIN Page Return to Shark Gallery Page


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Megalodon Size vs Tooth Size


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Is Megalodon Alive?


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** Fossilguy Store:
"The MegaMug" Megalodon Travel Mug!
Only $14.00 & Free Shipping!


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Fossil Great White Shark Gallery


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Megalodon Collecting Location:
PCS Mine, Aurora, NC


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Megalodon Collecting Location:
Calvert CLiffs, MD


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Parts of Sharks that Fossilize


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Shark Evolution


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Fossil Shark Gallery


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Squalodon Gallery - Facts and Information


** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Tyrannosaurus rex
Megalodon was the most fearsome animal in the seas, but T. rex was of the most fearsome land animals of all time!




Reconstructed Megalodon Shark Jaw, complete with fossil teeth
Reconstructed Megalodon Jaw, complete with fossil teeth.
Image taken by Edenpictures.
Carcarocles Megalodon Fossil Shark Teeth - Facts and Information
Assortment of Carcharocles Megalodon Fossil
Shark Teeth Found Over the Years.

CARCHAROCLES (Jordan & Hannibal, 1923)
Megalodon: The Megatooth Sharks

Facts About the Megalodon
Evolution, Size, Diet, Extinction
Where to Find Megalodon Teeth Fossil Tooth Morphology Megalodon Fossil Examples

** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** A huge megalodon fossil tooth found at the PCS mine in Aurora, NC ** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** Diving for megalodon fossil shark teeth in South Carolina
fossil hunting for megalodon teeth facts and information about megalodon sharks - fossil megatooth sharks megalodon shark tooth fossil giant fossil fossil shark tooth
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** ** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** Searching for fossil megalodon teeth in North Carolina ** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **


Megalodon Shark Facts and Information

Origins of the Megalodon shark - Megalodon History and Evolution

Megalodon tooth comparison with a Great White Shark and a T-rex dinosaur tooth
Megalodon Shark Teeth Size vs Great White Tooth
vs T. Rex Tooth.
Reconstructed Megalodon Skeleton from the Calvert Marine Museum, Solomons, MD.
This is a reconstructed megalodon skeleton from the Calvert Marine Museum, Solomons, Maryland. This megalodon is 35 feet in length.

Carcharocles megalodon fossil shark tooth from Summeville, SC
4 1/16" Fossil Megalodon Shark Tooth from South Carolina

With teeth that could reach over 7 inches, and a body more massive than a T-Rex, Megatooth sharks, particularly Carcharocles Megalodon, are undoubtedly the most infamous of all prehistoric sharks. This shark could eat Jaws in one bite!

By now, most paleontologists believe the Megatooth shark lineage dates back to the giant mackerel shark of the Paleocene, Otodus obliquus. Otodus was the top predator of the Paleocene oceans. Throughout the Eocene Otodus teeth became more and more serrated. The Eocene Tologaysor (say that 3 times in a row) formation in Kazakhstan shows this transition nicely. Each zone of the formation has Otodus teeth that are slightly more serrated over geologic time until they start looking like an early Carcharocles tooth.

Once the Otodus teeth became mostly serrated, paleontologists renamed the serrated Otodus genus to the Carcharocles genus, and thus the Carcharocles genus arose. Where the genus transition occurs depends on which paleontologist you ask. For instance, one transitional form, O. aksuaticus is called C. askuaticus by some; others regard C. auriculatus to be O. auriculatus, and so forth. Regardless of which transitional form is officially called a Carcharocles is a moot point. The point is that it is clear the Megatooth shark lineage (Carcharocles) was born from the Otodus lineage.

Notice, nothing was said about the Great White Shark, Carcharodon Carcharias. That's because the Megalodon is NOT related to the Great White Shark. Their evolutionary lines are very different. To learn about Great White shark origins and evolution, click here to go to the Great White Shark Gallery page.

Over time the Megatooth shark went through slight morphological changes. The teeth became more regularly serrated, the Otodus cusps got smaller, the crown got broader, and the overall size increased. Paleontologists assigned each slight tooth change of the Megatooth shark to a new Carcharocles species. The Megatooth shark reached its high mark as C. megalodon, a shark of monstrous proportions. The megalodon shark became extinct during the Pliocene and left no next of kin; the megalodon became too large and too specialized for its own good. It is a dead-end link on the tree of life.
A very rough chronology of Megatooth species, leading to the megalodon is shown on the following table:

Rough Time Period Shark Name
Paleocene O. obliquus
Early Eocene O. mugodzharicus
Early Eocene C. aksuaticus
Middle Eocene C. auriculatus
Late Eocene/Oligocene C. angustidens
Late Oligocene/Miocene C. subauriculatus
Miocene/Pliocene C. megalodon

It's important to note that each species is the Megatooth shark, with a slight change in tooth form over different periods of time. As a result, there are many teeth that are a cross between two species. For example, in the early Miocene, C. subauriculatus have large cusps, where by late Miocene the cusps are very small. Some paleontologists may further subdivide the many C. species, but it's important to remember all of the species are the same shark evolving over time. So don't worry if you find a tooth with very small cusps, and can't tell if it's a juvenile megalodon or a subauriculatus; it's a Megatooth shark, leave it at that!

Closeup of the megalodon jaw showing tooth rows
This image shows a closeup of the tooth rows of a megalodon shark. Like all sharks, the teeth are continually replaced by newer teeth waiting in rows behind the front tooth.
Size of the Megalodon shark, Behavior, and Extinction of Megalodon

The megatooth shark was clearly a top predator of its time. So, how big did a megalodon get? Some Megalodon shark teeth found have over a 7 inch slant height. Fossil teeth are more commonly between 3 and 5 inches. With that said, no one is sure what the body of the megalodon shark looked like. Therefore it is difficult to say how big the megalodon shark could get.

Years ago, lengths of 100 feet were speculated. Today, this length has been vastly shortened. Using tooth and jaw reconstructions from associated fossils, paleontologists have calculated possible size estimates. Some estimates give a megalodon a maximum length of around lengths around 54 feet (16.5 m), while other estimates are a bit lower, around 43 feet (13 m). The true size may lie somewhere in between. Either way, it was an impressive animal!
(Click here to go to the megalodon tooth size vs body size chart).

Here are some size comparisons of a large megalodon shark:

megalodon shark size vs a great white, mosasaur, blue whale, bus, person, t-rex, elephant, etc... C. Megalodon vs other animals - Megalodon size comparison to other animals.
Click on the image for the full sized version.

Megalodon Diet and Bite Force - What did Megalodons Eat?


Evidence suggests the obvious; this prehistoric shark ate whales and other cetacea for breakfast! It's fossils are almost always found in areas associated with fossil whale bone. Some of these fossil whale bones of the Miocene and Pliocene show bite marks from megalodon teeth. An example of megalodon predation evidence is shown in the images below.

In 2008, S. Wroe et al. did computer modeling of the Great White shark and C. Megalodon bite force based on jaw reconstructions. They found the megalodon to have a maximum bite force of around 182,000 Newtons (41,000 lbs). This is the largest bite force of any animal EVER! This high bite force verifies megalodon could have easily crunched up large whales. For comparison T-Rex has been calculated to have a maximum bite force around 57,000 Newtons (13,000 lbs).
To view either bite force article, scroll to the bottom of the page to the references section for links.

Megalodon fossils are often found with whale fossils, their food source.
Megalodon fossil shark tooth found associated with a cetacean vertebra.

These are cetotherium fossil whale vertebra from the PCS mine in Aurora, NC. These whales were a food source for megalodon
This image shows two "normal" cetotherium whale vertebras. The processes are broken off, but the centras are intact.

this whale vertebra has been bitten in half by a megalodon shark. Notice the large striations running through it created by the megalodon teeth
This image shows two views of a fossil cetotherium whale vertebra that has been bitten in half by a C. megalodon shark. Notice the large gouge marks where it has been bitten in half. The quality of this vertebra indicates it was probably swallowed.

How did the megalodon shark become extinct?

Yes, C. Megalodon is extinct! It is not living in the deep oceans, nor did it evolve into something else, like some pseudo-documentary and pseudo-science type tv programs say. There is absolutely no credible evidence that megalodon exists today. There is overwhelming evidence that megalodon is extinct.
For further information on why megalodon is extinct, go to the "Is Megalodon Alive Article"

We know Megalodon sharks died out millions of years ago. However, the exact reasons for its extinction though may never be fully understood. Megalodon extinction is probably due to a number of reasons (discussed below).

One reason that would have contributed to Megalodons extinction is at the end of the Pliocene, cetacean (whale and porpoise) diversity dramatically dropped. Many genera became extinct. Since cetacea was Megalodons primary food source, if the food source declines, it would be expected that Megalodon populations would also decline.

Another reason is that Megalodon was too specialized.
Being the biggest predator of the time has its disadvantages. History shows the big top predators are usually the first to go during times of extreme environmental change. By the end of the Pliocene, the Isthmus of Panama closed, which changed global ocean currents. Whales began to migrate into arctic regions, cold places where megalodons could not go. Also during this time period, Orcas, the Killer Whales, appeared on the scene. These large marine mammals that hunted in packs competed with the megalodons. If there are two top predators vying for the same food supply, one is going to lose, and we all know it wasn't the Orcas. It appears that a number of these factors contributed to the demise of the Megatooth shark. Millions of years of evolution had made the megatooth shark too large and too specialized to adapt to its changing environment.

Many people think a megalodon would also compete with Great White sharks in the Pliocene. This isn't the case. Due to the distinct size differences, Great Whites would have hunted smaller prey; i.e. Seals. Seals would have only whetted a megalodon's appetite. Megalodons would have had to prey on larger food; i.e Whales. Therefore, the megalodons and Great Whites would not have competed with each other.

If you want to read more about Great Whites and their own origins, go to the Great White Shark Gallery on this page.


Where to Find Megalodon Teeth

Megalodons are sharks, which mean they are made of cartilage. Cartilage is much softer than bone. Because of this, most of the megalodon will not fossilize. On some occasions, vertebra will fossilize, and occasionally fragments of cartilage. However, since shark teeth are made of dentin, a very hard substance, megalodon teeth readily fossilize, and are common as fossils in many fossil bearing Miocene and Pliocene formations worldwide. Below are some notable locations where megalodon teeth are found. Two famous global places for megalodon teeth are:

Peru and Chile:The Pisco Formation contains very large and beautiful megalodon teeth. They are found on land in the desert regions, with many other shark and whale fossils.

New Caledonia:Megalodon teeth have been dredged from the deep slopes of a fringing reef around New Caledonia. These teeth have eroded out of their Miocene formation, and are heavily worn. These South Pacific Megalodon teeth can no longer be dredged. However, this location is mentioned here, because these New Caledonian teeth continue to stir up controversy from time to time. Manganese dioxide dating of the teeth in the late 50's indicated an age of 11,000 to 24,000 years. Which means megalodon must have survived extinction. However, this type of manganese dioxide dating is now considered obsolete and invalid. The teeth from this area are clearly Miocene in age.

Large Fossil Megatooth Shark Tooth in original Matrix - Carcarocles Subauriculatus
Large Fossil Tooth of a Megatooth Shark Carcharocles Subauriculatus
in original Limestone Matrix - From Aurora, NC

North America Megalodon Shark Tooth Fossil Hunting Locations

South Carolina has a few formations which contain Megalodon teeth. The main formation is the Hawthorne Formation.
A while back, one could surface hunt in areas being developed that exposed this formation. The big development boom is now over, and it is now difficult to find places to legally access. However, the famous Black water rivers in South Carolina, such as the Cooper River, continually wash out megalodon teeth from this formation. The best way to find megalodon teeth in South Carolina is to dive for them! This isn't normal diving, it's Blackwater diving! This means there are strong currents, almost zero visibility, and alligators. It can be dangerous, and there are occasionally fatalities, so it is not for the novice diver. If you think you are ready to Blackwater dive, there are lots of charters that go out.

To Dive for fossils in South Carolina, you must have a "Hobby Dive License" From the SCIAA. Before you book a charter, be sure to have one. You must also report your finds. A link to the information is here:SCIAA Hobby Dive License Information.
If that link is down, the following link will take you to the actual forms: Hobby Dive License Forms.

If you think you are ready to Black Water dive, be sure to read about one of our Blackwater Dives! Click here for a Blackwater Dive Trip Report, it includes a video showing what black water diving is like.

The Following are two charters from Charleston that have good reviews. There are many more charters available, an internet search will give you a few more.

  • Cooper River Dive Charters
    These guys specialize in Black Water Diving.
  • Charleston Scuba
    I've never chartered from them but have been to their shop and rented tanks from them.

    Maryland has the famous Calvert Cliffs, which is a large Miocene exposure that runs along the Chesapeake Bay. It's in fact one of the largest continually running Miocene Exposures in the world. It's an awesome place to fossil shark tooth hunt. One simply combs the beach, looking in the surf line.
    Unfortunately, there are a few downfalls to this location for Megalodon teeth. First, the megalodon teeth are usually smaller than many other collecting locations. A 4" tooth is considered HUGE here. Secondly, access to most of the cliffs is private, and therefore illegal, and the public spots get hit HARD by fossil collectors. Despite this, it's a wonderful place to explore and fossil hunt at. For more information, go to the Calvert Cliff Site Page.
    -Calvert Cliff Fossil Site-

    North Carolina has the famous Pungo River and Yorktown Miocene and Pliocene Exposures. These exposures are however underground, and only pop out along some of the rivers. The PCS Phosphate mine in Aurora, NC use to allow collectors in to hunt these exposures. Now, due to safety reasons, fossil hunting has been restricted. However, the Aurora Fossil Museum near the mine has truckloads of the mine tailings to search through. One can still find a small megalodon tooth here. For more information, go to the Aurora Site Page.
    -Aurora, North Carolina Fossil Site-

    Florida has the Peace River Formation, which contains the Bone Valley Member. This streatches across central Florida. Famous places to look for megalodon teeth include the Peace River, and off the coast in the Gulf. The teeth here are usually smaller than normal. Again, a 4" tooth is HUGE for the Bone Valley area.
    Florida also requires a permit to fossil hunt for vertebrates (exempt are shark teeth). For information on the permit, go to the Permit section on the FMNH website.
Megalodon shark tooth diving in the Blackwater Rivers of South Carolina
Megalodon Shark Tooth Diving in the Blackwater Rivers of South Carolina

Megalodon Shark Tooth Hunting at a land site in South Carolina. It's was raining and getting dark, but it payed off!
Megalodon Shark Tooth Hunting at a land site in South Carolina. It's was raining and getting dark, but it payed off!

Megalodon Teeth Morphology

The megalodon shark teeth are unmistakable. They are big, robust, and serrated. However, identifying a specific species is a bit more difficult. Generally, knowing the formation, and thus the time period the tooth was found in, helps tremendously.

For example, if the tooth was found in an Eocene formation, its probably C. auriculatus, or C. aksuaticus, depending on the serrations. If it was found in Oligocene deposits, it's probably C. angustidens. Miocene formations would most likely have C. subauriculatus or C. megalodon, depending on if there are cusps on adult teeth, and a Pliocene formation would have C. megalodon.

Generally speaking, each successor species has the following changes: smaller cusps (no cusps for adult C. megalodon), a broader tooth form, a larger size, and more regular serrations. Juvenile C. megalodon sometimes have cusps, and therefore look identical to C. subauriculatus. Also remember, depending on the exact age and formation, a tooth may look more like a transition between two species.

The only genus Carcharocles may look similar to is that of Carcharodon. Carcharodon carcharias, the Great White shark, may look similar to the Megatooth shark. There are, however, some straightforward differences. First, Great Whites only occur in Miocene and Pliocene deposits, so they can be found with C. subauriculatus teeth and C. megalodon teeth. However, compared to Megatooth shark teeth, Great Whites are much thinner and smaller with less robust roots. Also Great White teeth do not have a bourlette, whereas Megatooth sharks have a very wide and noticeable one. Finally, Great White teeth have very coarse and irregular serrations, compared with the regular serrations of the Megatooth sharks.


The following fossil shark tooth Identification diagrams show three of the megatooth species, Carhcarocles megalodon, C. subauriculatus, and C. angustidens.
On the fossil tooth identification images below, the lingual sides of the teeth are the side facing the tongue, and are usually shown as the "display" side. The labial side is the side facing the front of the mouth. Labial sides are usually the smoother sides.


Identifying characteristics of a fossil megalodon (megatooth) shark tooth
Carcharocles megalodon tooth from Aurora, NC

fossil carcharocles subauriculatus (chubutensis) tooth idenification
Carcharocles subauriculatus tooth from the Calvery Cliffs of MD

** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Carcharocles angustidens tooth from Berkeley County, S.C.




Examples of Megatooth Shark Fossils from Different Collecting Locations
C. megalodon C. subauriculatus, C. angustidens,


C. megalodon(Agassiz, 1843)
Megatoothed Shark

Obviously, this is the most famous prehistoric shark, as it is the pinnacle of megatooth shark evolution. It has the largest teeth, was twice the size of a Great White, and included whales in its diet! They lived from the Miocene and became extinct in the Pliocene. I sure am glad they're dead!

Just how big was that shark your tooth came from? Click here to find out.
Huge megalodon fossil shark tooth
This is our biggest Aurora meg yet. It's a robust upper. Unfortunately, there is feeding damage to the tip.
It measures a hair over 4.5" across, and a hair over 5" tall, with a 6" slant height. It would probably have a 6 1/4" slant height if the tip was there.


Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a robust lower. There are a few chipped serrations however.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a decent sized Upper tooth. However the serrations are chipped off. It has the look of a reworked fossil.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is an upper tooth. The root has some damage done to it.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a beat up Lower lateral meg found while Blackwater Diving in the Lowcountry of South Carolina.


Formation:
  • Hawthorne Formation.
    Age:
  • Pliocene, 2.5-5 m.y.
    Location:
  • Beaufort County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 4 5/16" slant (109 mm)
    Date:
  • July 2008 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is my favorite meg, because its my largest complete land find from South Carolina. Just look at the colors! The coloration of lowcountry land teeth are beautiful.
It's an Upper tooth.


Formation:
  • Undetermined Formation.
    Age:
  • Pliocene, 2.5-5 m.y.
    Location:
  • "Superpit" in Berkeley County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 4 1/16" slant (103 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2003 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Here is a near perfect Upper Aurora tooth.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
I nice little Upper tooth with some feeding damage.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Lingual and labial view of a nice looking Lower lateral meg.

Click on the pic to see the trip this was found on.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Lingual and labial view of a nice looking Lower lateral meg.

Click on the pic to see the trip this was found on.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
The left tooth was found by snorkeling , The right one is a small but almost perfect anterior, except for the feeding damage on the tip.
This was pulled out of a chunk of fallen zone 10 of the Calvert formation.

Based on these teeth, the size of the sharks these teeth came from were probably around 15 feet in length.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
These are three small lateral megs. The left one is a labial view of a marble looking tooth. The right one is a lingual view of the first nearly complete C. megalodon tooth Amy found. The left two are labial views.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
All 3 of these laterals were found on the same stretch of beach in less than an hour. The person I was collecting with now hates me.
The left one is in perfect condition.

Formation:
  • Calvert, Plum Point Member
    Age:
  • Middle Miocene ~ 18-15 m.y.
    Location:
  • Willows, Calvert Co., MD
    Size:
  • Complete one has a 1 5/8" slant (41mm)
    Date:
  • Spring 2002



C. chubutensis (Ameghino, 1906) aka subauriculatus (Agassiz, 1839)
Megatooth Shark

This species is thought to have evolved into C. megalodon. The only difference is the tiny cusplets, and smaller size. This species is only found in the Miocene.
large fossil pre megalodon tooth, found in Pungo River limestone
This is a 3 5/8" C. subauriculatus in a chunk of Pungo River contact layer.

Click on the image to see it as found and being prepped.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a nice 3" subauriculatus in a chunk of Pungo River Coquina (Limestone).

Click on the image to see it as found and being prepped.

Formation:
Click to view the fossil as found
This is a lingual view of a 3" upper tooth.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
Click to view the fossil as found
Here is a chipped 3" subauriculatus.

Click on the image to see is as found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is the very first megatooth sharktooh I found!


It's an Upper tooth.

Based on this tooth, the size of the shark it came from was probably around 21 feet in length.

Formation:
  • Calvert, Plum Point member
    Age:
  • Early - Middle Miocene ~ 18-15 m.y.
    Location:
  • Plum Pt., Calvert Co., MD
    Size:
  • 2.75" (70mm) slant height
Click to view the fossil as found
This is a lingual view of a small lateral that Amy found.

Click on the image to see it when found.

Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE ** We found a tiny one... This guy was dug out of a chunk of fallen Zone 10 in the Calvert Formation.
It appears to have some feeding damage on the tip.


Formation:
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a small chipped Chubutensis posterior (from the rear of the mouth).
You can tell it's a Chubby, due to the tiny "cusp" at the edge of the tooth

Formation:
  • Calvert, Plum Point Member
    Age:
  • Middle Miocene ~ 18-15 m.y.
    Location:
  • Willows, Calvert Co., MD
    Size:
  • 1 1/8" (28.5mm) slant height
    Date:
  • Summer, 2001



C. angustidens (Agassiz 1843)
Megatooth Shark

This species is thought to have evolved into Carhcarocles subariculatus. The only difference is the cusps are larger, the blades are not as broad, and the teeth are often smaller in size. This species found in the Oligocene.
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a worn/beat up fossil tooth found while diving.


Formation:
  • Chandler Bridge Formation.
    Age:
  • Oligocene, ~28 m.y.
    Location:
  • Edisto River, Colleton County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 2 5/8" slant (66 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2004 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Here is another water worn shark tooth found from diving.


Formation:
  • Chandler Bridge Formation.
    Age:
  • Oligocene, ~28 m.y.
    Location:
  • Edisto River, Colleton County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 2 3/8" slant (60 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2004 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Here is a chipped angustidens fossil tooth from a land site in S.C.


Formation:
  • Undetermined Formation.
    Age:
  • Reworked into Pliocene?, 2.5-5 m.y.
    Location:
  • "Superpit" in Berkeley County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 2" slant (51 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2003 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
Here is a nice looking one with a "lightening" pattern on the blade. This fosisl tooth is from a drainage ditch in SC.


Formation:
  • Chandler Bridge Formation.
    Age:
  • Oligocene, ~28 m.y.
    Location:
  • Berkeley County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 1 3/4" slant (44 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2006 TRIP
** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **
This is a small shark tooth in near perfect shape from a land site in S.C.


Formation:
  • Undetermined Formation.
    Age:
  • Reworked into Pliocene?, 2.5-5 m.y.
    Location:
  • "Superpit" in Berkeley County, S.C.
    Size:
  • 1 5/16" slant (33 mm)
    Date:
  • Aug. 2003 TRIP


References / Works Cited

All References Page

K. T. Bates, P. L. Falkingham (2012). Estimating maximum bite performance in Tyrannosaurus rex using multi-body dynamics. Biology Letters.
Online Article

Purdy, R., Schneider, V., Appelgate, S., McLellan, J., Meyer, R. & Slaughter, R. (2001). The Neogene Sharks, Rays, and Bony Fishes from Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, North Carolina. In: Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III. C. E. Ray & D. J. Bohaska eds. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, No 90. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. pp. 71-202.

Ward, Lauck, W. (2008). Synthesis of Paleontological and Stratigraphic Investigations at the Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, N.C. (1958-2007). In: Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, IV. C. E. Ray, D. J. Bohaska, I. A. Koretsky, L. W. Ward, and L. G. Barnes eds. Virginia Museum of Natural History Special Publication, No 14. VMNH Publications, Martinsville, V.A. 2008. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. pp. 325-436.

Whitmore, Frank, C., and Kaltenbach, James A. (2008). Neogene Cetacea of the Lee Creek Phosphate Mine, North Carolina. In: Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, IV. C. E. Ray, D. J. Bohaska, I. A. Koretsky, L. W. Ward, and L. G. Barnes eds. Virginia Museum of Natural History Special Publication, No 14. VMNH Publications, Martinsville, V.A. 2008. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington D.C. pp. 181-269.

S. Wroe, D. R. Huber, M. Lowry, C. McHenry, K. Moreno, P. Clausen, T. L. Ferrara, E. Cunningham6 M. N. Dean, A. P. Summers (2008). Three-dimensional computer analysis of white shark jaw mechanics: how hard can a great white bite? Journal of Zoology. Volume 276, Issue 4, p. 336-342, December 2008.
Online PDF of Article



Back to TOP of Page



Find us on:
Facebook, , and Youtube.

** PLEASE DESCRIBE THIS IMAGE **

Purchase Megalodon Shark Products: